animal shelter Betty White Hillsborough County

100,000 Pets Saved At Hillsborough County Shelter Since 2012

Hillsborough County will celebrate a major milestone on Friday, Oct. 21: the 100,000th pet saved at the Michael S. Merrill Pet Resource Center since Hillsborough County committed to improving the live-release rate at the shelter a decade ago.

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, Fla. – Hillsborough County will celebrate a major milestone on Friday, Oct. 21: the 100,000th pet saved at the Michael S. Merrill Pet Resource Center since Hillsborough County committed to improving the live-release rate at the shelter a decade ago.

In 2012, the euthanasia rate at the shelter, like at most public shelters throughout the country at that time, was painfully high.

About 12,000 dogs and cats were euthanized that year, nearly two-thirds of the pets brought to the shelter.

Today, the Pet Resource Center’s live-release rate is above 90 percent, among the highest in the nation. Those figures are even more remarkable because the Pet Resource Center is the only open-admission shelter in Hillsborough County, meaning it accepts all dogs and cats regardless of age, medical condition, or breed.

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At 10 a.m. Friday, County and shelter officials will celebrate that accomplishment and recognize the local resident who adopted the 100,000th pet saved at the shelter since 2012.

The policy changes began with a commitment to trust and rely upon people in the community – pet owners, veterinarians, rescue groups, and many others – to band together to build a lifesaving community for pets. Among the policy and practical changes responsible for the dramatic improvement in live-release rates and accompanying drop in euthanasia:

  • The creation of a pet support team that works to help residents keep their pets rather than turning them over to the shelter. Team members can help resolve issues with pet behavior, provide food and other supplies, and even help arrange medical care.
  • Actively working with more than 300 pet rescue groups.
  • Establishment of a foster program that allows residents to take pets home for as little as a week. The program helps clear shelter space and provides valuable information about the pets’ behavior and personality, and many of the pets are adopted by the foster parents or their friends or families.
  • Establishing pet-enrichment programs such as dog play groups.
  • Quickly spaying/neutering and evaluating pets so most dogs and cats can go home the same day people decide to adopt them.
  • Allowing residents to view virtually all available dogs and cats at the shelter through an online kennel that includes photos, medical information and behavioral notes.
  • A commitment to matching people with the right pet, which increases owner satisfaction and reduces return rates.
  • Increasing the number and variety of medical issues that can be treated at the shelter. Animals with ailments that almost automatically resulted in euthanasia a decade ago are now routinely treated at the shelter by veterinary staff and ultimately adopted.

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