CDC COVID

CDC Changes Webpage On COVID-19 Vaccines, Doesn’t Detail Info Deleted

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention created a ruckus when it changed guidelines for COVID-19 reactions, including allowing asymptomatic children to remain in school.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention created a ruckus when it changed guidelines for COVID-19 reactions, including allowing asymptomatic children to remain in school.

But drawing far less attention – so far – is that the CDC changed the language on its website about the potential effectiveness of the mRNA COVID vaccines.

The conservative news website JustTheNews.com reported on Monday that the CDC “removed language from a page explaining how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work without telling the public the page had been updated, much less what had been changed.”

JTN said it gleaned that by reviewing an archive of the pages at issue.

“One of three headings under the ‘facts’ section was completely removed between July 22 and July 23,” the website noted.

That section previously said: “The mRNA and the spike protein do not last long in the body. Our cells break down mRNA from these vaccines and get rid of it within a few days after vaccination. Scientists estimate that the spike protein, like other proteins our bodies create, may stay in the body up to a few weeks.”

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JTN reported that as of Monday morning, the CDC page showed its last update was July 15.

Republican Rep. Thomas Massie of Kentucky, who was alerted about the language shift over the weekend, noted on social media, “The CDC is quietly deleting misleading information from their website.”

A CDC spokesman defended the change.

Spokesman Scott Pauley told JTN that the CDC “routinely reviews our webpage information to ensure we have consistent and up-to-date recommendations.” The “adjusted” page was changed to ensure consistency with the CDC’s other COVID vaccine pages.

“However, this was not a change to the science of how the mRNA vaccines work,” Pauley assured JTN.

“The mRNA from these vaccines are broken down by the cells that interpret this coding, and the process takes a few days after vaccination.”

Pauley failed to mention the website’s previous claim about the spike protein, or explain why the page shows the last update occurred on July 15.

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