As food costs rise amid broader inflation, state Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried said Tuesday she does not expect an interruption to summer

Florida Ag Commissioner Fried Seeks Political Relevance By Declaring “Florida Climate Week”

Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried appears to have a touch of Abrams’ Syndrome — as in Stacey Abrams, the Georgia Democrat who struggles to acknowledge that she lost an election four years ago.

Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried appears to have a touch of Abrams’ Syndrome — as in Stacey Abrams, the Georgia Democrat who struggles to acknowledge that she lost an election four years ago.

On Monday, Fried, Florida’s only statewide-elected Democrat, apparently not realizing she’s not the governor, nor understanding that she was trounced in her own gubernatorial primary six weeks ago, issued a proclamation recognizing “Florida Climate Week.”

“Climate change means we will have more frequent, intense hurricanes like Ian,” Fried tweeted along with her proclamation. “Our choices today will determine how future Floridians live in our state. Let’s choose a safer, more sustainable future for everyone.”

Fried failed to explain how Ian was caused by climate change, or how Florida could put a dent in a “global” warming issue.

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Fried’s document claimed that Florida is affected by sea level rise of an inch every three years, and that the state faces seven years of “above normal” hurricane activity.

Fried apparently missed that the storm season in the Atlantic Ocean was uncharacteristically quiet until a couple of weeks ago, and that Florida experienced zero hits from hurricanes between 2006 and 2017.

Fried also said the threat requires that Florida undergo “rapid transitions” to “zero-emission renewable energy sources” — apparently not paying attention to California’s energy-grid struggles and high power rates as it makes just such a transition.

Ultimately, Fried’s proclamation encouraged all Floridians “to utilize available resources to better understand the consequences of climate change, consider the role of climate change on our state, and collaborate with others to find sustainable solutions for ourselves and future generations.”

Maybe we could start by researching how Category 4 hurricanes treat pastures filled with solar panels and 300-foot-high wind turbines.

As The Free Press reported last week, noted climatologist Dr. Roy Spencer offered research showing that over the last 120 years there are “no statistically significant trends in either intensity or frequency of landfalling major hurricanes in Florida.”

Spencer added that the data indicate Florida was rocked by four storms with winds above 120 mph between 1919 and 1935 — the same number that have hit Florida, including Ian, since 1992.

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