Todd Bowles became the 13th head coach in Buccaneers history last week when Bruce Arians announced he was retiring.

How Each Buccaneers Coach Fared During Their Time In Tampa

After going 7-9 with Jameis Winston as his quarterback in his first year in Tampa, Arians had Tom Brady running the offeense the past two years. The result was a combined 24-9 record and a Lombardi Trophy to cap off the 2020 season
Bruce Arians, Credit: Tampa Bay Buccaneers

TAMPA, FL. – Todd Bowles became the 13th head coach in Buccaneers history last week when Bruce Arians announced he was retiring.

Arians slides into an advisory role after compiling a .633 winning percentage in his three seasons on the Bucs’ sideline. That is the highest mark by a coach in the team’s history.

Here is a look at how he and the 11 others fared.

Bruce Arians | 2019-2021 | 31-18 .633
After going 7-9 with Jameis Winston as his quarterback in his first year in Tampa, Arians had Tom Brady running the offense the past two years. The result was a combined 24-9 record and a Lombardi Trophy to cap off the 2020 season, which snapped a 12-year playoff drought. Arians’ five playoff wins are one less than the franchise accumulated prior to his arrival.

Dirk Koetter | 2016-2018 | 19-29 .396
Koetter was the Bucs’ offensive coordinator for one season under predecessor Lovie Smith before taking over the top job. After going 9-7 in his first season, a year in which the Bucs won seven of nine through the heart of the schedule, Koetter’s teams produced a pair of 5-11 campaigns before he was shown the door.

Lovie Smith | 2014-15 | 8-24 .250
After going 2-14 in his first season, Smith had No. 1 overall pick Jameis Winston to work with in 2015. At 6-6, the Bucs had playoff hopes going into the season’s back stretch. However, four straight losses took care of that, along with Smith’s job.

Greg Schiano | 2012-13 | 11-21 .344
After a 6-4 start, things quickly plummeted on and off the field. The Bucs lost 13 of 14 at one point under Schiano, who lost many of his players as well. He also irritated opponents, who had to be on guard during kneel downs. Schiano and GM Mark Dominick were canned a day after an embarrassing 2013 season-ending loss at New Orleans.

Raheem Morris | 2009-11 | 17-31 .354
It was wild ride under Morris, whose teams went from 3-13, to 10-6 and then 4-12. In 2010, the Bucs won four of their last five games with the defeat coming in overtime against the Lions. Not only did that loss ultimately cost the Bucs a playoff spot, but it was Detroit’s first road win after losing a league record 26 straight away from home.

Jon Gruden | 2002-2008 | 57-55 .509
Gruden’s first team after taking over for Dungy was the magical 2002 Bucs, who went 12-4 and allowed only 12.2 points per game. They defeated the 49ers and Eagles before knocking off the Raiders in Super Bowl 37. He led the Bucs to two more playoff appearances (2005, 2007), though the Super Bowl would be the Bucs’ last playoff win until the 2020 season.

Tony Dungy | 1996-2001 | 54-42 .563
In his second year, Dungy’s Bucs snapped a string of 14 straight losing seasons that dated to John McKay’s final season. Dungy molded a team that went to the playoffs four times in his final five seasons and set the stage for the team’s first Super Bowl title under Jon Gruden.

Sam Wyche | 1992-1995 | 23-41 .359
After starting 5-2 in 1995, it looked like the Bucs might put an end to a string of 12 consecutive losing seasons. Alas, it was a struggle the rest of the way, including losing four of their last five to finish 7-9. That was as good as it got under Wyche.

Richard Williamson | 1990-91 | 4-15 .211
Williamson, who was coaching Bucs receivers, took over for Perkins at the end of the 1990 season before going 3-13 in 1991. That year, the Bucs averaged only 12.4 points and were held to less than 10 points five times.

Ray Perkins | 1987-90 | 19-41 .317
The former Alabama coach, who took over for Bear Bryant, was relieved of his duties 13 games into the 1990 season. The best he could do was a pair of 5-11 seasons.

Leeman Bennett | 1985-86 | 4-28 .125
Bennett succeeded McKay and proceeded to post a pair of 2-14 seasons. In 1986, the Bucs were outscored by nearly as many points as they scored (234 to 239) and failed to score more than 17 points in either of their final seven games, all losses.

John McKay | 1976-1984 | 44-88-1 .335
The Bucs’ first coach was a great quote who turned around a team that lost its first 26 games only to appear in NFC championship game in its fourth season. Tampa Bay made the playoffs three times in a four-year stretch before going 8-24 in McKay’s final two seasons.

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