The keyboardist for the 1980s rock band Journey has been slapped with a cease-and-desist order for playing one of the band’s own songs.

Journey Faces Internal Squabble Over Their Song Being Played At Trump Event

The keyboardist for the 1980s rock band Journey has been slapped with a cease-and-desist order for playing one of the band’s own songs.
Journey Photo Via Twitter, former President Donald Trump, File Photo

The keyboardist for the 1980s rock band Journey has been slapped with a cease-and-desist order for playing one of the band’s own songs.

His crime?

Playing the song at Mar-a-Lago.

According to The Washington Times, Journey guitarist Neal Schon hit keyboardist Jonathan Cain with the cease-and-desist letter after he performed the 1980s hit-makers best-known song at the Florida estate of former President Donald Trump.

Cain’s performance at a private event last month reportedly featured GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor-Greene, Arizona Republican gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake and commentator Kimberly Guilfoyle, Don Trump Jr.’s girlfriend, singing backup vocals.

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The Times reported that Schon’s letter asserted Cain “has no right to use Journey for politics,” and that his politics “should be his own personal business.”

“He should not be capitalizing on Journey’s brand to promote his personal political or religious agenda to the detriment of the band,” the letter continued, saying it was a “harmful use of the brand.”

Cain co-wrote “Don’t Stop Believin’” with Schon and vocalist Steve Perry. Cain’s wife is televangelist Paula White, Trump’s spiritual adviser, and he has reportedly long supported Trump.

The letter appears to be another example of some bad blood between the three men.

Cain, Schon, and Perry have been in repeated legal battles over the group’s songs and band-related in-fighting, the Times noted.

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In response to Schon’s letter, Cain’s lawyer told the Times, “Schon is just frustrated that he keeps losing in court and is now falsely claiming the song has been used at political rallies.”

That was a reference to a previous lawsuit filed by Schon, who claimed Cain wrongfully cut off his access to the group’s American Express account.

The Times noted that other bands, such as Aerosmith and the Rolling Stones, have complained about Trump using their songs at rallies. But since those are public events, there is nothing the can do legally to force Trump to stop.

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