According to the plea agreement, Carter, a registered nurse who previously was employed by a hospital in Jacksonville, worked in a neural intensive care unit (ICU) providing intensive and specialized care to critically ill patients with life-threatening neurological problems. Certain ICU patients were prescribed intravenous doses of fentanyl, which is synthetic opioid used as a pain medication and as anesthesia.

Judge Says Pull License Of Florida Physician Assistant Who Performed Plastic Surgery With No Doctor

The Florida Board of Medicine should revoke the license of a Port St. Lucie physician assistant who performed plastic-surgery procedures without a doctor present, an administrative law judge ruled Thursday.
TFP File Photo

The Florida Board of Medicine should revoke the license of a Port St. Lucie physician assistant who performed plastic-surgery procedures without a doctor present, an administrative law judge ruled Thursday.

In a 23-page decision, Judge Darren Schwartz wrote that physician assistant Adley Dasilva “practiced beyond the scope permitted by law, or accepted and performed professional responsibilities which he knew, or had reason to know, that he was not competent to perform, by independently performing the complex plastic surgeries.”

The Board of Medicine in August filed a complaint against Dasilva, with the case then going to the state Division of Administrative Hearings. Schwartz held a hearing in November on the allegations, which involved performing procedures such as liposuction and what are known as “Brazilian butt lifts” in January and February, according to the ruling.

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In addition to concluding that Dasilva was not qualified to perform the procedures, the administrative judge also said one case involved medical malpractice because a patient’s wound was not properly treated.

In a Dec. 12 document, Dasilva’s attorney argued, in part, that the physician assistant could perform the procedures under a doctor’s delegation of authority.

“In sum, the controlling law does not categorically prohibit physician assistants from performing the plastic surgery procedures at issue in this case under indirect supervision — that is, without a physician in the operating room or on the premises,” the document said.

Under administrative law, Schwartz’s ruling was a recommended order that will go to the Board of Medicine for final action.

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