A Republican lawmaker in Texas has proposed a constitutional amendment simply to ensure parents have and retain control over how they raise their children.

Texas Lawmaker Seeks To Write ‘Parental Rights’ Into State’s Constitution

A Republican lawmaker in Texas has proposed a constitutional amendment simply to ensure parents have and retain control over how they raise their children.
Texas State Rep. James Frank

Another sign of the warped times we live in:

A Republican lawmaker in Texas has proposed a constitutional amendment simply to ensure parents have and retain control over how they raise their children.

State Rep. James Frank offered the amendment last week, according to CNSNews.com.

His proposed amendment states: “The liberty of a parent to direct the upbringing of the parent’s child is a fundamental right. This right includes the right to direct the care, custody, control, education, moral and religious training, and medical care of the child.”

But there could be an issue with part of the wording,

The measure adds, “The state or a political subdivision of this state shall not interfere with the rights of a parent … unless the interference is essential to further a compelling governmental interest and is narrowly tailored to accomplish that compelling governmental interest.”

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Still, a pro-traditional family group in Texas praised Frank’s bill.

“A Parental Rights Amendment is the best way to ensure parental rights are protected for future generations,” the Family Freedom Project said in a statement.

“Right now, the rights of Texas parents rest almost entirely in the hands of unelected federal judges, who come and go regularly and could change their minds on parental rights at any time.”

The proposed amendment, the group added, “represents a powerful statement of support for a simple idea: Parents have the right and responsibility to raise their children, and this must be protected.”

To become law, Frank’s resolution must pass two-thirds of both the state House and Senate. If it clears that hurdle, it would go on the Nov. 7, 2023, ballot, where it must be approved by a majority of voters.

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