The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) killed over 1.7 million animals in 2021, according to data released by the USDA.

Biden Admin’s USDA Killed 1,757,364 Animals In 2021 And 1 Bald Eagle On Accident

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) killed over 1.7 million animals in 2021, according to data released by the USDA.

1,352,827 of the species were invasive to the United States the data shows.

According to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service division of the USDA, the “Wildlife Services” provides wildlife damage management assistance to protect agriculture, natural resources, property, and health and safety.

“In many instances, more than a single type of resource benefits from operational management activities. For example, Wildlife Services biologists work with the aviation community to reduce wildlife hazards at airports to protect public safety and reduce property damage to aircraft. Wildlife Services protects resources through implementation of integrated wildlife damage management programs,” says the USDA on its website.

According to the data released, in 2021, 63,965 coyotes were killed or euthanized, and over 19,000 Mourning Doves.

Topping the list of kills were European Starlings, with 1,028,642 killed in 2021.

In Florida, the USDA took out 517 Black Spiny Tailed Iguanas among other animal species, including 638 Laughing Gulls, 2,354 Exotic Reptiles, 1,113 Red Cardinals, and 1,512 Mourning Doves.

In total, 20,140 Florida Wildlife creatures were killed or euthanized.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) killed over 1.7 million animals in 2021, according to data released by the USDA.

One Bald Eagle was unintentionally killed in Minnesota, according to the data. The report states that the Bald Eagle was caught with, Traps, Body Grip, and died.

According to the USDA, “the Program’s efforts help people resolve wildlife damage to a wide variety of resources and to reduce threats to human health and safety. Funding for the WS Program is a combination of federal appropriations and cooperator-provided funds.”

“The program’s efforts help people resolve wildlife damage to a wide variety of resources and to reduce threats to human health and safety. Funding for the WS Program is a combination of federal appropriations and cooperator-provided funds,” according to the USDA.

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